NEWS

AZ primary: Senator McCain fends off Kelly Ward, Grijalva to run uncontested

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In Arizona's primary elections on Tuesday, 822,400 Arizonans casted their ballots. Senator John McCain fended off a primary challenge from Arizona State Senator Kelli Ward. McCain won over half of the Republican primary votes.

The senator will run against U.S. Representative Ann Kirkpatrick, who did not face a Democratic primary challenger, for a sixth term come November.

Democratic U.S. Representative Raúl Grijalva, who represents Arizona’s third congressional district—which encompasses the UA campus—did not face a primary challenger. Grijalva will run for a second two-year term in the U.S. House of Representatives in November, without a Republican challenger.

State Senator Olivia Cajero Bedford did not face a primary challenger in Arizona’s third legislative district, which also encompasses the UA campus. She will run unopposed to serve a second two-year term representing the third legislative district in the state senate.

State Representative Sally Ann Gonzales defeated State Representative Macario Saldate by just over 2,000 votes in the Democratic third legislative district's primary.

Every two years, each of Arizona’s 30 legislative districts sends two candidates to Arizona’s House of Representatives. Both candidates seeking their second terms will appear on this November’s ballot alongside Green Party nominee Edward J. Cizek III. No Republicans will challenge these seats.

Three out of the five seats on the Arizona Corporation Commission are up for election. Tom Chabin narrowly defeated William Mundell in the Democratic primary, but both candidates will appear on the November ballot.

Four Republicans appeared on the primary ballot. Robert Burns received the most votes, followed by Andy Tobin and Dunn Boyd. Rick Gary, who received 18.16 percent of the votes and came in last, will not appear on the general election ballot.

The three candidates who receive the most votes this November will serve a four-year term on the commission.


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