NEWS

POBEAT: 10/24/16

A mysterious object

University of Arizona Police Department officers responded to the Shantz building in reference to a reported black handgun seen in the bushes on Oct.11 at 8 a.m.

The suspected black handgun was on the ground and was slightly concealed by leaves and branches.

UAPD looked at the gun and determined it was a BB gun, from what appeared to be a screw-off mechanism at the base, used to remove and insert carbon dioxide cartridges.

The BB gun had no serial number and was placed in UAPD’s evidence and found property. There were no damaged windows, according to UAPD.

Bad habits die hard

A UAPD officer was monitoring traffic at Sixth Street and National Championship Drive on Oct. 12 when the officer noticed a black Mercedes-Benz traveling at a high speed.

The officer verified the vehicle’s speed at 59 mph in a posted 30 mph zone. The officer conducted a traffic stop and made contact with the driver who was identified as a UA student.

The male student told the officer he didn’t know the speed limit because he very rarely drives around campus and was unaware of the speed at which he was traveling. 

When the officer told the student how fast he had been going, the student apologized and said he had received several speeding tickets back home in Illinois and had just paid off the most recent one. 

According to UAPD, the student said the Mercedes-Benz belonged to one of his fraternity brothers and only used the vehicle when running errands. 

The UAPD officer placed the student under arrest for driving 20mph over the speed limit. 

At this point, the student became upset and explained he had nine prior speeding tickets in Illinois and his father would take him out of school for another one. The student asked numerous times if the officer could cut him a break, according to police. The officer explained the consequences of not showing up in court to the student.

Somebody’s watching you

A UAPD officer responded to a harassment call on Oct. 11 in reference to a UA student receiving text messages from an unknown number. The suspected male subject began inviting the student to meet and have sex. 

In an attempt to gain more information from the unknown number, the student pretended to be interested. The unknown subject said he knew what dorm the student lived in and where their room was. At one point, the unknown number said he knew someone that could let him into the student’s room for a “quickie.”

The unknown subject claimed he had friends “watching” the student and knew people were at the student’s room. 

The texts became increasingly threatening, with the subject advising the student and their roommate to watch their backs going to class because the subject felt that the student was setting him up. 

While officers could not match the phone number with a UA student, the officer called the number and left a message advising the subject to stop harassing the student or charges would be filed.


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