OPINION: Showing my appreciation for Martha McSally

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On Aug. 28 U.S. Representative Martha McSally blew away the Republican primary polls in Arizona. With Senator Jeff Flake retiring, the race to keep a Republican in the senate seat was on. This year, luckily, the United States had some of the strongest voter participation in years. 

This is amazing, and it shows that people are finally starting to become more involved in their communities. Kyrsten Sinema won this election in Arizona, but I want to acknowledge the other candidate in the election, Martha McSally.

McSally is finishing up her term as the U.S. representative for Arizona's second congressional district. McSally graduated as valedictorian of her high school and went on to attend the Air Force Academy to attain her bachelor’s degree. 

She continued her education, earning her master's degree at Harvard University. She continued even further and graduated first in her class at the U.S. Air War College after pursuing pilot training there. 

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I do think Martha McSally should have won. As soon as the prohibition of women flying in combat was lifted in 1991, McSally took the initiative and chose to fight for her country in one of the bravest ways that she could — as a fighter pilot. 

McSally was the first female American fighter pilot to not only fly in combat but also command a fighter squadron. She is one of the highest-ranking female pilots in the history of the Air Force, where she served from 1988 until 2010. She was awarded the Bronze Star and six air medals. 

McSally shows women that they can be just as tough, if not tougher, than any man in both the military and in politics, and she is one of the best role models for young girls today.

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McSally also constantly supports and fights for women. She sued and successfully won her case against the U.S. Department of Defense in order to stop military women from being obligated to wear a full body covering, called an abaya, when off military base in Saudi Arabia. McSally said she respected this aspect of the Saudi Arabian culture but made the case that other women, who were not a part of the culture, should not have to conform to a religion that they do not follow. 

McSally is one of the most inspirational women in politics right now, and it’s a shame that she will not be able to represent Arizona. McSally, being only 52, has accomplished so much in her lifetime. This strong woman is the perfect example of how far women have come in the military and in politics. 


Danielle Morris is a junior studying English and creative writing. She is looking forward to seeing what accomplishments McSally will achieve in the coming years. Follow Danielle on Twitter



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