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OPINION: Go Greek and How

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Alex McIntyre | The Daily Wildcat

Potential new members line up outside of Chi Omega sorority on Aug. 20, 2015. Greek life is just one way students can get involved.

Greek Life… oh so very known but yet so many questions on how to get involved. At the University of Arizona, we are fortunate enough to have 53 fraternities and sororities on campus that belong to three governing councils. Greek Life exists at the UA to strengthen students' academic and co-curricular experience while also being immersed with developmental opportunities to create purpose in greek members all around. 

The United Sorority and Fraternity Council is home to 12 identity-based sororities and 9 identity-based fraternities, including the Divine Nine fraternities and sororities. They require a minimum college GPA of 2.5, meaning that you can join after your first semester! If you’re looking to join a USFC sorority, the process for joining can vary by organization. However, you can start by filling out a USFC interest form and they will be in contact with you regarding the events the council will hot for those interested to meet and learn about the different chapters.

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The Panhellenic Council represents 13 sororities at the UA that belong and are represented through the National  Panhellenic Conference. The main way to join a Panhellenic sorority is to go through formal recruitment. Some sororities participate in informal recruitment in the Spring. It is encouraged to go through formal recruitment with a minimum of a 3.0 core GPA from high school or a 2.75 college GPA if you have 12 plus college units. Formal recruitment allows all the women interested to visit and interact with the women of each chapter. The week-long process consists of three sets. Throughout the week, the women will visit less chapters and attend longer events based on mutual likeness. By the end of the week, the women going through formal recruitment have to make a final decision by choosing the Panhellenic sorority that they feel the most comfortable in. Set One is the first two days, where the first day each woman visits half the houses the first day then the other half the second. Set One is all about getting to know the women, the chapter and, most importantly, the women in the chapter getting to know how awesome you are. Set Two is also two days, and the potential new members will visit up to nine chapters and learn about the chapters' philanthropy. Set Three, also known as “Sisterhood Day,” is where potential new members will visit up to six chapters and consists of house tours if the chapter has one. On the last day, known as "Preference," the women will visit up to two chapters wearing more formal clothing to ultimately make their final decision afterwards. The women will receive their bids August 25 and celebrate with their group off-campus. Final registration closes August 1.

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The Interfraternity Council is home to 27 national fraternities that require those going through formal recruitment in the fall or informal recruitment in the spring to have a minimum 2.75 core GPA from high school or a 2.5 college GPA if you have 12 plus college units. Similar to Panhellenic formal recruitment schedule, IFC has rounds instead of sets. Round One will be two days consisting of the first day visiting half of the IFC organizations and visiting the next half on day two. Round Two is two days where potential new members will visit up to 12 organizations between the two days. Throughout the week, similar to Panhellenic recruitment, men will visit less and less houses throughout the week and will have to choose the one that fits them best. The men will receive their bids on the first day of classes and celebrate with their chapters. Final registration closes August 1.

It’s time for you to go greek if you want to cultivate lifelong friendships, serve your community, enhance yourself academically and be a part of something bigger than yourself. 


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