Science

When tech is too much

There are no bones about it, mining the precious minerals used in our electronics has had some pretty serious environmental impacts. Sure, some of these precious minerals end up in life-saving technology that changes the world, but others end up in products that seem simply to serve as a big middle-finger to nature. This week, we’re going to dive into the innovations that only extravagant consumerism could produce. Read more

A genetically modified conversation

A showing of the film “Food Evolution” generated a lively post-show discussion at the Loft Cinema, bringing together three University of Arizona professors and a local farmer to share their perspectives on GMOs. Read more

An exoskeleton built on passion

“I was very involved in a world where I would see a lot of potential in the orthopedics,” Galaz said. "As I kept going with my education, I realized that’s what I wanted to do. It’s my biggest passion in the medical field to help others." Read more

Cassini spacecraft ending 20-year mission by crashing into Saturn

On Friday, Sept. 15, the Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn will hurl itself into the gas giant, ending its twenty-year long mission. In its final moments, the spacecraft will collect unique data unlike anything seen before, including samples of Saturn's atmosphere and various pictures of the planet. Read more

The future of battery power: You

RELATED: UA research team works to cure memory loss in heart bypass patients RELATED: Long time UA employee steps in as Interim Director of Housing Follow Brian Winkler on Twitter Read more

New polymeric sunscreen first of its kind

Chemists at the University of Arizona have developed a new, long-lasting sunscreen that won’t break down or absorb into your skin. “We’re the first to develop a polymeric sunscreen material,” said Ravindu Nanayakkara, a graduate student in chemistry and researcher involved with the project. Read more

Creating Mars on Earth

Off the West coast lies a research facility that informs the NASA mission to Mars. The Hawai’i Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (HI-SEAS) program tests the endurance of humans in limited living space and resources. Read more