Mailbag: Sept. 28

‘Separate but equal' an unacceptable solution


I'd like to say that Anna Swenson wrote a very well articulated article (""Separate not equal: right to the altar needs altering,"" Sept. 25), which is often unheard of lately. In my opinion, the standards in certain publications have fallen significantly.

MORE FROM THE DAILY WILDCAT


As a fellow English major, I can assume you know how irritating that is. In any case, the points you made were more than valid. One of the most striking sentences you wrote was, ""Which begs the question: if marriage and civil unions are truly equal, why must they be separate at all?"" That cuts to the heart of the matter (once we've gotten to the point where civil unions are accepted).


I don't understand why President Obama, who himself should be ultra-aware of discrimination issues, is allowing this ""separate but equal"" thought process to continue. I love the phrase ""separate institutions are inherently unequal."" It is so true, and relates so completely to the fight for equality for gay rights.


As a femme lesbian, I cannot tell you how many times I have had to correct people when they ask what my husband does, or ask about my ""roommate."" It is especially important to me that the United States recognize gay marriage so that my own parents will have to finally accept that I'm not going through some phase, and that I will be legally bound to my girlfriend, whether they like it or not. In fact, I already am, but they don't know it, and won't, unless the matter of power of attorney somehow comes into play in my health care.


The last sentence in your article is what really made me write to you, though. ""Until ‘homophobe' conjures up the same apologetic fervor as ‘racist,' logical and empathetic Americans must realize that separate can never be equal, and that the fight for civil rights for all Americans is never really over."" You are so right, and I can only wonder when that moment will be. Unfortunately, I don't see it happening for another few decades, at least. It breaks my heart.


Julia Forrester

Macomb, Ill.


Share this article