Science

Turning the tide against malaria

After decades of research, testing and development, the world may finally have a vaccine to turn the tide against malaria. The new malaria vaccine, also known as RTS,S or by its brand name Mosquirix, was developed by GlaxoSmithKline. Read more

UA COVID-19 Test Tracker

Daily (12/8)
669 11 1.6%
Total (8/2)
66,070 1,065 1.6%
Includes tests since August 2, 2021
Data from https://covid19.arizona.edu/updates
Updated December 8, 2021

Is the new coronavirus variant cause for concern?

Across the pond, in the United Kingdom, a new variant of the original SARS-CoV-2 virus was first identified. As an RNA virus, the novel coronavirus is more susceptible to mutations, given its weaker proofreading capabilities. The variant, called B.1.1.7., has a handful of mutations — 23, in total — in its genetic code. Read more

Frontline workers reflect nine months into COVID-19 pandemic

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization officially declared the coronavirus outbreak a "pandemic." Since then, the world has documented 75 million infections and 1.7 million deaths, and the U.S. is currently seeing its worst days in terms of cases, hospitalizations and deaths. Read more

FDA approves Pfizer's coronavirus vaccine, distribution begins

On Friday, Dec. 11, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued an emergency use authorization for Pfizer/BioNTech's coronavirus vaccine as the country is currently seeing record numbers of cases, hospitalizations and deaths. This action will pave the way for millions across the U.S. to start receiving the vaccine this week. Read more

UA graduate student studies the chatty life of covert squirrel

University of Arizona researcher Allie Burnett knows more about the elusive Harris’ antelope ground squirrel than practically anyone in the world. “They’re not chipmunks,” she often corrects people. At her study site in the UA Santa Rita Experimental Range, a blur of stripes ripped through the desert dust and she thought, “Was that a zebra-tailed lizard, or was that an antelope squirrel?”  Read more

COVID-19 and basic science research: What has changed?

It is no secret that COVID-19 has had a devastating impact worldwide, on both academic and non-academic interests. Within the United States, we are leading the world in case count and total deaths, with over 14 million cases and 266,000 deaths reported since January 2020. Read more

Personalized vaccines: The new frontier in cancer treatment

Exciting results from a new clinical study showed that a personalized vaccine combined with an immunotherapy drug had a promising response rate in patients with advanced incurable head and neck cancer. Dr. Julie Bauman, chief of Hematology and Oncology at the University of Arizona College of Medicine — Tucson, led a phase one clinical trial with the pharmaceutical company, Moderna, to test the combined use of personalized vaccines created from tumor DNA with the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab. Read more

Tips and tools for succeeding in STEM courses

As the semester comes to an end, many may be thinking about what they would have done better to receive the grade that they wanted in a course. People work hard to achieve the grades they earn, yet the key is to identify early on what tools will be most beneficial for you. Read more

Knocking down the COVID-19 disparities through university community partnerships

The University of Arizona, in partnership with Arizona State University, Northern Arizona University and the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, made Arizona one of the 11 states that are participating in the National Institute of Health’s Community Engagement Alliance Against COVID-19 Disparities. With a $1 million-a-year grant, the Arizona CEAL COVID Consortium is working with over 30 community leaders and organizations to identify and combat COVID-19-related health disparities. Read more

Should professors be more lenient with assignments due to stress and anxiety?

It should come as no surprise that anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in the United States. The Anxiety and Depression Association of America has stated that anxiety disorders are affecting approximately 40 million adults in the United States. This translates to having 18.1 percent of the United States population being diagnosed, with only 36.9 percent of that cohort receiving treatment. Read more